Lord Edgware Dies (Hercule Poirot #9) by Agatha Christie

Published: 1933 (Also published as “Thirteen at Dinner” in the US by Dodd, Mead and Company 2. Genre: Murder mystery 1. First lines. 2. Cover: Harper Collins 3. Background: Retro Woman 1930s [Public Domain] via Public Domain Pictures. 4. A selection of different editions of “Lord Edgware Dies” [Fair use]

Actor Jane Wilkinson is unhappily married to Lord Edgware who has refused a divorce. After she tells friends she wants him dead, he is found murdered in his home. Poirot investigates the usual suspects.

“And that same evening – that very same evening – Lord Edgware dies. Good title that, by the way. Lord Edgware Dies. Look well on a bookstall.”

“Lord Edgware Dies by Agatha Christie

Glanceabook: All the red herrings, mistaken identities, and plot twists are here as expected from Agatha Christie. Another enjoyable whodunnit.

Quotes:

“The positive witness should always be treated with suspicion, my friend. The uncertain witness, who doesn’t remember, is unsure, will think a minute – ah! yes, that’s how it was – is infinitely more to be depended upon!”

“Enemies! People these days don’t have enemies! Not English people!”

Author: Agatha Christie

Adaptations:

  • “Lord Edgware Dies” is a 1934 British movie directed by Henry Edwards and starring Austin Trevor, Jane Carr, and Richard Cooper.
  • Thirteen at Dinner” is a 1985 British-American television movie adapted from the novel “Lord Edgware Dies” directed by Lou Antonio and starring Peter Ustinov, Faye Dunaway, Jonathan Cecil, Diane Keen, Bill Nighy and David Suchet.
  • Lord Edgware Dies” is an episode of the British crime drama “Agatha Christie’s Poirot“, featuring David Suchet as Poirot, aired in 2000.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s